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University of Winnipeg Course on History of Ukraine 2015-2016

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HIST – 3310-001 (Fall-Winter 2015/6)

Wednesday 02:30PM – 05:15PM, Room 2C14
Andriy Zayarnyuk: a.zayarnyuk@uwinnipeg.ca
Room: 3A29
Phone: (204) 786-9371
Office hours: T 10:30-12:30 (or by appointment)

 Topics in Modern Ukrainian History

 This course examines selected topics in Ukrainian history from ca. 1800 to the present. This year the course focuses on the formation, transformations and versions of Ukrainian national identity in the nineteenth and twentieth century. Spatially it focuses on the lands of present-day Ukraine and mainly follows their fortunes in the Habsburg and Romanov Empires and the Soviet Union. It also discusses Western Ukraine in interwar Poland, post-Soviet Ukraine and a number of wartime regimes.  The course consists of both lectures and seminars, in-class discussions based on readings are here an important component.

 

Required texts:

Serhy Yekelchyk. Ukraine: Birth of a Modern Nation. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007). (hereafter – SY)

Andrew Wilson, Ukraine Crisis: What It Means for the West (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015) – Kindle edition is available from amazon.ca for 3.15 CAD, together with the free application for reading it on other platforms.

Other required texts are listed in the course calendar and will be either provided in electronic form on Nexus or available for download from internet or our library e-journals’ collection.

 

Assignments and grades:

  • Book review (11%),
  • 4 quizzes (24%),
  • Contribution to the discussions (30%)
  • Final essay (35%)

Assignments Explanation:

 Book review:  you have to write 1000 words long review of a scholarly book on Ukrainian history you are planning to use for your final essay. The reviews should be handed to the instructor by 6 January 2016. Book reviews will be marked for a) book’s relevance – 10%; b) apprehension of book’s main thesis and secondary arguments – 30%; c) justness and soundness of your critique -30%; d) your writing style – 30%;

4 short quizzes: in class, at random times (but not in the first and the last week of classes), there will be four 15 minutes long quizzes, 10 questions each. These quizzes will be based on factual material provided in SY. Each quiz is worth 5% towards your final mark. You will not be able to redo a missed or failed quiz.

Contribution to the discussions: starting with our second week, each class will consist of a lecture and of a seminar. Topics of the seminar and required readings are listed in the calendar. Readings for the class should be done in advance and will be used as the basis of our discussion. Besides academic articles and conventional historical sources, our readings include nineteenth and twentieth century fiction, which we shall analyse as a historical source. Each student will have to prepare two 10 minutes presentations introducing readings and providing agenda for discussion. Each presentation is worth 5% towards the final mark. By contributing to the discussion everyone will be able to score 2% per seminar towards the final grade. To count towards the final grade contributions should demonstrate student’s knowledge of the textbook material and additional readings, be relevant to the discussion’s topic, based on valid arguments and to help advance the discussion. For an outstanding contribution additional 0.5% will be given.

Final essay should be submitted to the instructor by March 30, 2016. Essays should be 15-20 double-spaced pages in length, Times New Roman, 12 or any other font similar in size and readable (footnotes and endnotes can be single-spaced, 10). This is a research essay, which implies serious work with secondary and primary sources in the library. Research essays cannot be based on textbooks or encyclopedia entries. Students must use monographs, articles in scholarly journals, other source materials (at least 5 directly relevant sources are expected). “Sources for further reading” in your textbook is a good place to start researching your essay topic. All the submitted essays should be typed; handwritten essays will not be accepted. Since our library’s holdings in Ukrainian history are poor, please use library’s interlibrary loan service (free for students) and UofM’s libraries.

The paper need not have a single “thesis,” but must show evidence of research and thought and be well written.

Papers must have references indicating pages: I need to know where you are getting your information from. It is not enough just to provide notes for quotations. Please choose one of the major referencing systems used in social sciences and humanities (eg. MLA, APA, Chicago etc.) and use it consistently.

Sometimes papers get lost and sometimes papers raise questions that require discussion between instructor and student. Please therefore retain a copy of your paper as well as a copy of any raw notes relating to the paper until you have received your paper back with grade and comments.

Research papers should be on the topic of your choice, but the exact title of the research paper should be submitted in writing together with your book review and approved by the instructor by 25 November 2015. Failure to get paper approval by that date will result in 20% of the grade being docked from your paper grade.

You are not allowed to change essay topics.

Essays will be evaluated for:

-Research (finding and using a range of appropriate primary and secondary sources) 20%

-Arguments (knowledge of the subject, of the secondary literature and of the general context, ability to express your own views and to support them with the sufficient evidence) 40%

-Organization (logical and justified plan, balanced structure, sequence of arguments) 20%

-Style (grammar and syntax, vocabulary) 20%

Late submissions will not be accepted.

Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Direct quotations and paraphrases must be acknowledged in footnotes, endnotes or in-text references.  A bibliography of all materials you have consulted should appear at the end of your essay.  Failure to acknowledge sources (plagiarism) is regarded as academic misconduct. On this – please consult Section VII/7 of the Course Calendar. Please read section VII/7-9 of the University of Winnipeg general calendar for all the regulations concerning academic misconducts, Senate and grade appeals

Papers must have footnotes or endnotes: I need to know where you are getting your information from. It is not enough just to provide notes for quotations. Please choose one of the major referencing systems used in social sciences and humanities (eg. MLA, APA, Chicago etc.) and use it consistently. The paper need not have a “thesis,” but must show evidence of research and thought. Sources for papers cannot be limited to the internet; there must be substantial work in offline resources (books, articles in scholarly journals, other source materials).

Sometimes papers get lost and sometimes papers raise questions that require discussion between instructor and student. Please therefore retain a copy of your paper as well as a copy of any raw notes relating to the paper until you have received your paper back with grade and comments.

 

Distribution of grades

 100-90             A+

89-84               A

83-80               A-

79-77               B+

76-70               B

69-67               C+

66-58               C

57-50               D

49-0                 F

 

Calendar

 09/09:

Introduction to the course

 

16/09

Historical Roots of Modern Ukraine

SY, 1-32;

Rudnytsky, Ivan L. “The Role of the Ukraine in Modern History,” Slavic Review, 22:2 (1963), 199-216.

 

23/09

The End of the Cossack Autonomy and Two Empires

 SY 33-39

“Istoriia Rusov (excerpts),” in Ralph Lindheim and George S. N. Luckyj, Towards and Inellectual History of Ukraine: An Anthology of Ukrainian Thought from 1710 to 1995 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), 82-87.

 

30/09

National “Awakening”

SY 40-45

Gogol, Nikolai, “Taras Bulba,” in Gogol, Nikolai, “Taras Bulba and Other Tales,” available at http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1197/1197-h/1197-h.htm

Yoon, Saera. “Transformation of a Ukrainian Cossack into a Russian Warrior: Gogol’s 1842 “Taras Bulba”.” The Slavic and East European Journal, Vol.49, No.3 (Fall 2005), 430-444. Available for download from Jstor.

 

7/10

Patriots and Associations

SY 40-45

Taras Shevchenko, “Chihirin,” “The Epistle,” “Kholodnyi Yar” (pdf copy).

Mykola Kostomarov, “The Books of the Genesis of the Ukrainian People (excerpts), in Ralph Lindheim and George S. N. Luckyj, Towards and Inellectual History of Ukraine: An Anthology of Ukrainian Thought from 1710 to 1995 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), 94-100.

 

14/10

The Galician Case

SY 45-52

Franko, Ivan. “A Constitution for Pigs,” in Ivan Franko, Stories. Kyiv: Mistetstvo Publishers, 1972, 126-134.

Ivan L. Rudnytsky, “The Ukrainians in Galicia under Austrian Rule,” in his Essays in Modern Ukrainian History (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1987, 315-352.

 

21/10

Ukraine enters the Age of Mass Politics

SY 53-64

Hrinchenko, Borys. “Brother against Brother,” in Franko, Roma and Morris, Sonya. Eds. Brother against Brother. Selected Prose Fiction (Toronto: Language Lanterns Publications, 2010), 162-216.

Ivan L. Rudnytsky, “The Ukrainian National Movement on the Eve of the First World War,” in his Essays in Modern Ukrainian History (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1987, 375-388.

 

28/10

World War I and the Ukrainian Revolution

SY64-73

Osyp Makovey, “From the Cycle “A Bloody Field,” in Roma Franko and Sonya Morris (eds.), Between the Trenches. Selected Prose Fiction (Toronto: Language Lanterns Publications, 2010), 242-282.

 

4/11

The Revolution as a Civil War

SY 73-84

Valeriyan Pidmohylny, “The Haidamaka,” in Roma Franko and Sonya Morris (eds.), Conflict and Chaos. Selected Prose Fiction (Toronto: Language Lanterns Publications, 2010), 244-263.

Marko Bojcun, “Approaches to the Study of the Ukrainian Revolution,” Journal of Ukrainian Studies 24:1 (1999), 21-38.

 

18/11

Soviet Ukraine in the 1920s

SY 85-101

Terry Martin, “An Affirmative Action Empire: The Soviet Union as the Highest Form of Imperialism,” Ronald Grigor Suny and Terry Martin, eds. A State of Nations: Empire and Nation-Making in the Age of Lenin and Stalin (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006), 67-92.

Borys Antonenko-Davydovych, “Tap-Tap…,” in Roma Franko and Sonya Morris (eds.), Conflict and Chaos. Selected Prose Fiction (Toronto: Language Lanterns Publications, 2010), 41-88.

 

25/11

Stalinism: Famine and Terror

SY 103-120

Lyudmyla Hrynevych, “The Present State of Ukrainian Historiography on the Holodomor and Prospects for Its Development,” <http://www.harrimaninstitute.org/MEDIA/01291.pdf>.

Mark B. Tauger, “The 1932 Harvest and the Famine of 1933,” Slavic Review, v.50, No.1 (Spring 1991), 70-89. (Jstor).

Jacques Vallin, France Mesle, Serguei Adamets, Serhii Pyrozhkov, “A New Estimate of Ukrainian Population Losses during the Crises of the 1930s and 1940s,” Population Studies, v.56, No.3 (Nv.2002), 249-264. (Nexus)

 

3/12

Western Ukrainian Lands between the Wars

SY121-134

John-Paul Himka, “Western Ukraine between the Wars,” Canadian Slavonic Papers, 1992 34(4): 391-412.

Snyder, Timothy. The Reconstruction of Nations. Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus, 1569-1999. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003, 133-153.

Dmytro Dontsov, Nationalism (excerpt), Ralph Lindheim, George Stephen Nestor Luckyj. Eds. Towards an Intellectual History of Ukraine: An Anthology of Ukrainian Thought from 1710 to 1995. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996, 262-268.

 

6/01

Ukraine’s World War II (I)

Snyder, Timothy. Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin. New York: Basic Books, 2010, 157-217.

13/01

Ukraine’s World War II (II)

SY 135-147

John A. Armstrong, “Collaborationism in World War II: The Integral Nationalist Variant in Eastern Europe,” Journal of Modern History 1968 40(3):396-410.

20/01

War after War and Stalin’s Last Years

SY 147-151

Jeffrey Burds, “AGENTURA: Soviet Informants’ Networks in Galicia, 1944-1948,” Eastern European Politics and Societies 11:1 (January 1997), 89-130.

Roman Szporluk, “West Ukraine and West Belorussia: Historical Tradition, Social Communication and Linguistic Assimilation,” Soviet Studies 1979 31(1):76-98.

 

27/01

Ukraine under Khrushchev

SY152-159

Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, “Theses on the Three Hundredth Anniversary of the Reunion of Ukraine with Russia (excerpt),” Ralph Lindheim, George Stephen Nestor Luckyj. Eds. Towards an Intellectual History of Ukraine: An Anthology of Ukrainian Thought from 1710 to 1995. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996, 303-315.

3/02

Ukraine under Brezhnev

SY 159-176

Ivan Dziuba, “Internationalism or Russification? (excerpt),” Ralph Lindheim, George Stephen Nestor Luckyj. Eds. Towards an Intellectual History of Ukraine: An Anthology of Ukrainian Thought from 1710 to 1995. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996, 330-340.

Vasyl Stus, selected poems, <https://yabloo.wordpress.com/category/translations>

 

10/02

Perestroika

SY 177-190

Volodymyr Dibrova, “from Beatles Songs,” in Ed Hogan (ed.), From Three Worlds: New Ukrainian Writing (Moscow: Glas, 1996), 23-30.

Yury Andrukhovych, “Observation Duty,” in Ed Hogan (ed.), From Three Worlds: New Ukrainian Writing (Moscow: Glas, 1996), 207-227.

17/02 READING WEEK, NO CLASS

 

24/02

Independence

SY 190-192

The Supreme Council of the Ukrainian SSR. “Declaration of State Sovereignty of Ukraine,” online at

<http://gska2.rada.gov.ua/site/postanova_eng/Declaration_of_State_Sovereignty_of_Ukraine_rev1.htm>

The Supreme Council of the Ukrainian SSR. “Declaration of Independence of Ukraine,” online at <http://static.rada.gov.ua/site/postanova_eng/Rres_Declaration_Independence_rev12.htm>

Serhii Plokhy, The Last Empire: The Final Days of the Soviet Union (New York: Basic Books, 2014), 152-170.

 

2/03

Difficult 1990s

SY 193-208

Roman Szporluk, “Ukraine: From an Imperial Periphery to a Sovereign State,” Daedalus 126 (Summer 1997):85-119.

 

9/03

The First Maidan

SY 208-228

Andrew Wilson, Ukraine’s Orange Revolution (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2005), 122-155, 174-205.

 

16/03

The Revolution of Dignity

Roman Szporluk, “The Making of Modern Ukraine: The Western Dimension,” Harvard Ukrainian Studies, 2001, v.25, No.1/2, 57-90.

Andrew Wilson, Ukraine Crisis: What It Means for the West (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).

 

23/03

Ukrainian-Russian War

Andrew Wilson, Ukraine Crisis: What It Means for the West (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).

 

30/03

Course Summary, Final essays are due

Not all of the topics listed on the outline may be covered in the actual course.

Only e-mails from your University of Winnipeg email address (Name@webmail.uwinnipeg.ca) will be answered in a course related correspondence.

Students with documented disabilities, temporary or chronic medical conditions, requiring academic accommodations for tests/exams (e.g., private space) or during lectures/laboratories (e.g., note-takers) are encouraged to contact Accessibility Services (AS) at 786-9771 or accessibilityservices@uwinnipeg.ca to discuss appropriate options. All information about a student’s disability or medical condition remains confidential. http://www.uwinnipeg.ca/accessibility.

Students facing a charge of academic or non-academic misconduct may choose to contact the University of Winnipeg Students’ Association (UWSA) where a student advocate will be available to answer any questions about the process, help with building a case, and ensuring students have access to support. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit our website at www.theuwsa.ca/academic-advocacy or call 204-786-9780.

We ask that you please be respectful of the needs of classmates and instructors/professors by avoiding the use of unnecessary scented products while attending lectures. Exposure to scented products can trigger serious health reactions in persons with asthma, allergies, migraines or chemical sensitivities.  Please consider using unscented necessary products and avoiding unnecessary products that are scented (e.g. perfume).

 The voluntary withdrawal date (without academic penalty) for this course is 20 January, 2016.    

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